Oneness - True Faith
wizanda
666 AD Pope made more of a mess of things Posted on: 2006/7/5 14:58
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Pope VitalianQuote:
Dates:
Born: ? (Italy)
Died: January 27, 672
Pope: 657 - January 27, 672 (14 years)

Biography:
Pope Vitalian's reign was most concerned with trying to achieve a political and religious reconciliation between Rome and Constantinople over the dispute about Monotheletism. He was not successful, so the conflict continued to divide East and West. :


WE will add all cause and effect of dooms day and murders of most of englands citzens as witchs after... for disobying the laws set in motion here by this pope.

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wizanda
Re: 666 AD Pope made more of a mess of things Posted on: 2006/7/5 15:13
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Reign

After the death of Pope Eugene I, on 2 or 3 June, 657, Vitalian was elected his successor, and was consecrated and enthroned on 30 July.[1]

Monothelite controversy

Like Eugene, Vitalian tried to restore the connection with Constantinople by making friendly advances to the Eastern Emperor Constans II (641-668) and to prepare the way for the settlement of the Monothelite controversy. He sent letters (synodica) announcing his elevation to the emperor and to Patriarch Peter of Constantinople, who was inclined to Monothelitism. The emperor confirmed the privileges of the Roman Church and sent to Rome a codex of the Gospels in a cover of gold richly ornamented with precious stones as a good-will gesture.[2]

The Patriarch Peter also replied, although his answer was somewhat noncommittal as to Monothelitism, a belief he defended. In his letter, he gave the impression of being in accord with the pope, whose letter to Peter had expounded the Catholic Faith. Thus ecclesiastical intercourse between Rome and Constantinople was restored, but the mutual reserve over the dogmatic question of Monothelitism remained. Vitalian's name was entered on the diptychs of the Byzantine Church---the only name of a pope so entered between the reign of Honorius I (d. 638) and the Sixth Ecumenical Council of 680-81.[3]

The inclusion of Vitalian's name on the dyptichs was seen as some as being too conciliatory towards heresy, but that charge was unfounded.[4]

Vitalian showed reciprocity toward Constans, when the latter came to Rome in 633, spending twelve days there during a campaign against the Lombards. On 5 July the pope and members of the Roman clergy, met the emperor at the sixth milestane and accompanied him to St. Peter's, where the emperor offered gifts. The following Sunday, Constans went in state to St. Peter's, offered a pallium wrought with gold, and was present during the Mass celebrated by the pope. The emperor dined with the pope on the following Saturday, attended Mass again on Sunday at St. Peter's, and after Mass took leave of the pope. On his departure Constans stole a large number of bronze artworks, including the bronze tiles from the roof of the Pantheon, which had been dedicated to Christian worship.[5]

Constans then raided Sicily, oppressed the population, and was assassinated at Syracuse in 668. Vitalian supported Constans' son Constantine IV against a usurper and thus helped him attain the throne. As Constantine had no desire to maintain the Monothelite decree (typus) of his father, Pope Vitalian made use of this inclination to take a more decided stand against Monothelitism and to win the emperor over to orthodoxy. In this latter attempt, however, he did not succeed. The Monothelite patriarch Theodore of Constantinople removed Vitalian's name from the diptychs. It was not until the Sixth Ecumenical Council (681) that Monothelitism was suppressed, and Vitalian's name was replaced on the diptychs of the Byzantine Church.[6]

Relations with England

Pope Vitalian was successful in improving relations with England, where the Anglo-Saxon and British clergies were divided regarding various ecclesiastical customs. At the Synod of Streaneshalch, King Oswy of Northumberland accepted Roman practices regarding the keeping of Easter, and the shape of the tonsure. Together with King Egbert of Kent, he sent the priest Wighard to Rome, to be consecrated there after the death of Archbishop Deusdedit of Canterbury in 664, but Wighard died at Rome of the plague.[7]

Vitalian wrote to King Oswy promising to send a suitable bishop to England as soon as possible. Hadrian, abbot of a Neopolitan abbey, was selected, but he considered himself unworthy to be bishop. At his recommendation a highly educated monk, Theodore of Tarsus, who understood both Latin and Greek, was chosen as Archbishop of Canterbury and consecrated on 26 March, 668. Accompanied by Abbot Hadrian, Theodore went to England, where he was recognized as the head of the Church of England.[8]

Ravenna

The archiepiscopal See of Ravenna reported directly to Rome. Archbishop Maurus of Ravenna (648-71) sought end this dependence, and thus make his see autocephalous. When Pope Vitalian called upon him to justify his theological views, he refused to obey and declared himself independent of Rome. The pope excommunicated him, but Maurus did not submit, and even went so far as to excommunicate the pope.[9]

Emperor Constans II sided with the archbishop and issued an edict removing the Archbishop of Ravenna from the patriarchal jurisdiction of Rome, and ordained that the former should receive the pallium from the emperor. The successor of Maurus, Reparatus, was in fact consecrated, in 671. It was not until the reign of Pope Leo II (682-83) that the independence of the See of Ravenna was suppressed: Emperor Constantine IV repealed the edict of Constans and confirmed the ancient rights of the Roman See over the See of Ravenna.[10]

Authority over Eastern Church

Vitalian enforced his authority as supreme judge in the Eastern Church. Bishop John of Lappa, had been deposed by a synod under the presidency of the Metropolitan Paulus. John appealed to the pope, and was imprisoned by Paulus for so doing. He escaped, however, and went to Rome, where Vitalian held a synod in December, 667, to investigate the matter, and pronounced John guiltless. He then wrote to Paulus demanding the restoration of John to his diocese, and the return of the monasteries which had been unjustly taken from him. At the same time the pope directed the metropolitan to remove two deacons who had married after consecration.[11]

Other

The introduction of church organ music is traditionally believed to date from the time of Vitalian's papacy.

Vitalian was considered a firm ruler of the Church, one who preserved discipline. He died January 27, 672. Venerated as a saint, his feast is kept on that date.[12]


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wizanda
Re: 666 AD Pope made more of a mess of things Posted on: 2006/7/5 15:27
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To explain that clearly lets get that straight?

1). he changed the musical scales of the folk tunes to lower frequencies and involved them in Church worship so fooling most to believe it was the same.

2). though most of the world except a Christ figure this pope saw it needed to be enforced seeing that the popes before where Jewish and more multicultural.

3). Wighard was murdered and so the law giver on her throne was dethroned by the shoe as is the shapes of the islands and in prophecy somewhere along them lines.

4). Newly appointed archbishop who was also from tarsus as was Paul and Vitalian, so in some part of this they are related and not appointed by God yet generation and favouritism.

5). Introduced the idea of the trinity as it is ancient English and earlier of the myriad of things made from 3dimension being sound.
All these customs were incorporated into Christendom, yet has nothing to do with it as we are clearly told there are 24 divided by 2, as each is masculine and feminine elders and Yeshua is Elohim or elder as told.

6). Changed the concept of Easter to a sick joke of sacrifice and martryism and not Christianity as any Christ can tell you as many of us are now.
The martyr part is due to murder by family thinking if they steal a role of authority they can do better, yet God writes on the DNA and as such they have a long list of things that God wishes them to do, so not being appointed by God means why our world is falling to pieces.

In all of these we can fix it, yet single handily this will cause more problems and it is far easier for the resources to allowed to be given to our light workers, as no matter which we look at it, if you refuse at some point it will get messy and you are well aware of this and why it has been hidden so long.

Yet since so many people are now investigating wouldn't it be better to let us fix the world make people believe in God again and heal the nations with cures, rather then wars of you lot fighting, when all we want is love and you shoot us.

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wizanda
Re: 666 AD Pope made more of a mess of things Posted on: 2006/7/5 15:34
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Quote:
Except that he was a native of Segni in the Campagna and that his father's name was Anastasius, nothing is known of this saintly pope's early life. Enthroned on July 30, 657, Vitalian at once held out olive branches to the estranged East. He sent letters to the Emperor Constans II and to Peter, patriarch of Constantinople. The Emperor replied graciously and sent the Pope a copy of the Gospels with a gold cover adorned with jewels. At this time Constans seems to have abandoned his policy of persecution. The patriarch also replied in a friendly manner. In answer to Vitalian's exhortation to return to Catholic unity and orthodoxy, Peter replied that he believed like the Pope. Vitalian's name was inserted in the Constantinople diptychs. Vitalian has been accused of being too conciliatory towards heresy, but the charge is, to say the least, not proven. Actually his name was removed from the Constantinople diptychs later by a more actively Monothelite patriarch.

In 662 Emperor Constans decided to go west and establish himself in Italy. Not too popular at Constantinople, he sought new prestige in the West. When he approached Rome he was met at the sixth milestone by Pope Vitalian and the clergy. His stay in the Holy City was harmonious, and peacefully he visited Rome's famous shrines. His parting gesture, however, gave the city little cause to remember his visit with pleasure. Constans seized all the bronze he could lay hands on, taking even the bronze tiles from the famous Pantheon, now St. Mary of the Martyrs. Unable to cope with the Lombards, Constans withdrew to Sicily. Here in the midst of a reign of terror, the despot was knifed in his bath. With the accession of his son Constantine IV, better times dawned.

Pope Vitalian had trouble with Ravenna and Crete. The archbishop of Ravenna wished to get more independence from Rome, and had successfully appealed to Emperor Constans II. This trouble lasted until the pontificate of Leo II. From Crete came an appeal from John, bishop of Lappa. Bishop John had been deposed by a synod under the direction of the metropolitan of Crete, John. The Pope held a synod at Rome, decided that John had been unjustly condemned, and ordered the metropolitan to reinstate him in his see.

Vitalian had the satisfaction of learning that in the great synod of Whitby, England definitely adopted the Roman date of Easter. To England he sent one of Canterbury's greatest archbishops, the learned and pious monk, Theodore of Tarsus.

Vitalian was considered a firm ruler of the Church, one who preserved discipline. He died January 27, 672. Venerated as a saint, his feast is kept on that date.

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